Liga MX Club Guide – The Hipster Version – Part I

Liga MX Club Guide – The Hipster Version – Part I

Bryce Dunn - Yes, it's that time. Time I don my rolled up trousers, braces, thick frame glasses, twiddly moustashe and blasted out some God Speed! Yo

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Bryce Dunn –

Yes, it’s that time. Time I don my rolled up trousers, braces, thick frame glasses, twiddly moustashe and blasted out some God Speed! You Black Emperor. But why, I hear you ask. That is because I’m clearly a hipster. Ok, maybe I do not like or have any of the above but I do like the latest football trend that is Liga MX, and therefore I bring you the all important Liga MX club guide.

As stated brilliantly by Manuel Veth in a prior article, there are many reasons to tune into the Liga MX games like the amount of goals, crowd attendances or the way their league operates. I tune in for the simple reason that it is fun. End to end football that seems to have a sprinkle of WWE.

One of the issues is finding somewhere to watch games. Online you can find a way to watch any team in the world and this will be made easier next year when Liga MX games are broadcasted on Facebook. Now that this issue is resolved, the next is which team to support. Here’s where we shall briefly breakdown each of the sides in our Liga MX club guide:

Liga MX Club Guide

Club América

Club América are one of the two most popular teams in Mexico. (Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images)

Club América are one of the two most popular teams in Mexico. (Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images)

Possibly the best-known club in Mexico which is largely due to becoming champions more often than any other side: a total of 12 times and runners up nine. The Azulcremas are based in Mexico City and play out of the famous Estadio Azteca. Current manager and ex-Argentinian goalkeeper, Ricardo La Volpe, is struggling to repeat the heights his side achieved in the Apertura 2016 where they narrowly lost out in the final. Club América legend Cuauhtemoc Blanco was world famous for his flair on the pitch and bunny hop style, trademark move, the Cuauhtemina, but in the present day they look to Mexican striker Oribe Peralta for flair in the shape of goals.

Atlas

Martin Barragan (R) of Atlas celebrates near teammate Fidel Martinez after scoring against Leon during their Mexican Clausura football tournament match at Jalisco stadium in Guadalajara, Mexico. (HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

The side was founded back in 1910 amongst some friends in a bar whilst reminiscing on previous footballing ventures during their time in Europe. Fans of the Foxes have not had much to cheer about over the years with only a single championship title to their name despite be in the top division now for 89 years. The last championship was back in 1951. In the Clausura this time round it looks like they will be set to reach the top eight play-offs but, with the unpredictability of the league, I probably should not speak too soon. The trophy cabinet at the club may remain bare but their success over the years has come from their youth academy. The club has produced talents such as Jared Borgetti and Rafael Márquez.

Chiapas

Jonathan Fabbro of Chiapas celebrates his goal against Toluca during their Mexican Clausura 2017 Tournament football match at Nemesio Diez stadium on January 22, 2017, in Toluca, Mexico. / AFP / MARIA CALLS (Photo credit should read MARIA CALLS/AFP/Getty Image The Jaguars might be the most hipster of club to choose in our Liga MX club guide

Jonathan Fabbro of Chiapas celebrates his goal against Toluca during their Mexican Clausura 2017 Tournament football match at Nemesio Diez stadium on January 22, 2017, in Toluca, Mexico. ( MARIA CALLS/AFP/Getty Image

Formerly known as Club de Futbol Jaguares de Chiapas, the southern-based Mexican side are one of the newest sides in the division with a history spanning back to 2002. The club are currently winless when it comes to championship victories but, with a promising start to 2017, maybe we will get to witness their first. Porto and Atlético Madrid fans may recognise the club name as it is Colombian striker Jackson Martínez’ former club. One of the current players to watch out for is veteran Jonathan Fabbro, who is able to produce goals from midfield.

Cruz Azul

Cruz Azul's defender Omar Mendoza controls the ball during the Mexican Clausura football tournament match against Chiapas at the Azul Stadium in Mexico City on March 4, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Yuri CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Cruz Azul’s defender Omar Mendoza controls the ball during the Mexican Clausura football tournament match against Chiapas at the Azul Stadium in Mexico City (YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

The blue crosses were originally based in the town of Jasso but moved to Mexico City in 1971 and now play out of the Estadio Azul. Cruz Azul have a rich history of success including a 2013 Clausura title, although it was the 1970s when they were at the peak and won six titles in ten years. This created the nickname, La Maquina (the locomotive machine), based on a powerful train that travelled from Jasso to Mexico City. This season, that machine could benefit from from some maintenance, as the side seem to be struggling for wins and goals. Their 36-year-old midfielder Christian Giménez has been the star performer in a side that has shown a glimpse of the determination and force of bygone years but unfortunately failed to put many points on the board. This giant appears to still be on its siesta, and therefore a great choice for hipsters, who are reading this Liga MX club guide.

Guadalajara

Angel Zaldivar of Guadalajara celebrates after after scoring against Veracruz during their Mexican Clausura 2017 tournament football match at Chivas stadium on March 18, 2017 in Guadalajara, Mexico / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

Angel Zaldivar of Guadalajara celebrates after after scoring against Veracruz during their Mexican Clausura 2017 tournament football match at Chivas stadium. (HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

Along with América, Club Deportivo Guadalajara, or Chivas, are one of the two most well supported clubs in the country. Both have been in the top flight for 93 years and have 12 and 11 titles each. Chivas are the only team in the league that has a strict rule of fielding only Mexican players, which results in supporters suggesting Chivas represent the natives and América represent the US. Chivas policy of only signing Mexicans also make them the natural hipster choice in our Futbolgrad Network Liga MX club guide. The Jalisco side have a few players of potential but it is midfielder Rodolfo Pizarro and his four goals this season that has taken the plaudits. Narrowly put out in the Apertura in the quarterfinals by rivals America this time round, they will be looking to go all the way. Stopping them will be a challenge for even the best in the league.

Club León

Leonel Lopez (L) of Leon vies for the ball with Abraham Gonzalez (R) of Pumas during their Mexican Clausura 2017 Tournament football match at Nou Camp stadium on January 21, 2017, in Leon, Mexico. Pumas won the match 0-1. / AFP / GUSTAVO BECERRA (Photo credit should read GUSTAVO BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

Leonel Lopez (L) of Leon vies for the ball with Abraham Gonzalez (R) of Pumas during their Mexican Clausura 2017 Tournament football match at Nou Camp stadium. (GUSTAVO BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

Back in 1943, it was decided that Guanajuato needed a football team and, only five years later, they won their first championship. Recent years have not been as fruitful for León, except for 2013 and 2014 when they won the Apertura both times with the aid of former Barcelona footballer, Rafael Marquez. This seems fitting as their stadium is called the Nou Camp. The side, unfortunately, have had a poor start to the year and will require former Wigan striker, Mauro Boselli, to hit the form of his life if they are to reach the play-offs. Club León has a lot of work to do if they wish to ignite the rivalry with Guadalajara for titles as they did 70 years ago. With the revolving door at most Mexican clubs, Argentinian coach, Javier Torrente, will lucky to keep his job if results do not change.

Our Liga MX club guide will be continued…

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Bryce Dunn is a Northern Irish football writer and Podcaster. Bryce hosts the popular Bundesliga – Gegenpressing Podcast, which is the most in-depth English-speaking Bundesliga Podcast available and Golazo an English-speaking Podcast covering Mexico’s Liga MX on the Futbolgrad Network. He is an avid Liverpool FC supporter, who enjoys researching German and Mexican football clubs whether they are part of the elite or the lower divisions. Follow Bryce on Twitter @BryceDunn11.

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