Barra Brava: Violence Continues

Barra Brava: Violence Continues

Violence among Argentina’s Barra Brava football hooligans continues, as a supporter of Unión de Santa Fe died from wounds he sustained from a gunshot while clashing with Barra Brava from Union de Santa Fe’s city riva Colón Santa Fe last weekend. Santa Fe is located about 470 kilometres north of Buenos Aires. The victim, Fabricio Echagüe, was just 32 years old, and he is already the third fatality caused by clashes of Argentinian football hooligan groups known as Barra Brava this season. During the same clashes two Colón fans also sustained gun shot injuries. Last year 16 people died during confrontations, and 12 died in 2013, and another 12 in 2012 according to an NGO called Salvemos al Football (Let’s Save Football). Much of the violance is instigated by the Barra Brava, which strongly compare to ultra groups in southern and eastern Europe both in terms of the level of violence associated with them as well as their mafia like structures. Aside from clashing with their favourite clubs, the Barra Brava are also involved in dealing drugs, weapons, and money laundering. Those criminal activities have let to even more clashes between different fan groups, even if they support the same club. In 2013, for example, a Boca Juniors match had to be suspended because of a shootout that had taken place before a Boca Juniors game. Two people were killed in that particular incident in which 150 bullets were fired. Drive-by shootings between different fan groups have also become a common occurrence. But fan violence is not the only problem in Argentinian league football. Just two weeks ago a San Lorenzo fan died after falling 50 metres from the back of a stand at the Nuevo Gasómetro during San Lorenzo’s classico derby against their rivals Huracán. This particular incident occurred despite the fact that the stadium announcer asked fans to get down from elevated positions within the stadium. These recent incidents show that Argentinian football need true reform. The recent reform attempt that introduced a new league system has done little to address major issues such as fan violence and the many outdated, crumbling stadiums. The new behemoth league system actually aggrevates the current situation as rivals are now set to play each other even more often, but the lack of proper security measures, and the fact that the Barra Brava effectively control the ticket sales of the major clubs means that violence and security risks will remain a major problem. Another issue is corruption and that the Barra Brava have been able to buy favours among local politicians, and police forces, which makes actual reform virtually impossible in the country in the near future. By Manuel Veth -

Tijuana vs Santos Laguna – Liga MX Preview
Vancouver Whitecaps vs Montreal Impact – MLS – Preview
Tigres vs Chivas – Liga MX Preview

Violence among Argentina’s Barra Brava football hooligans continues, as a supporter of Unión de Santa Fe died from wounds he sustained from a gunshot while clashing with Barra Brava from Union de Santa Fe’s city riva Colón Santa Fe last weekend. Santa Fe is located about 470 kilometres north of Buenos Aires.

The victim, Fabricio Echagüe, was just 32 years old, and he is already the third fatality caused by clashes of Argentinian football hooligan groups known as Barra Brava this season. During the same clashes two Colón fans also sustained gun shot injuries. Last year 16 people died during confrontations, and 12 died in 2013, and another 12 in 2012 according to an NGO called Salvemos al Football (Let’s Save Football).

Much of the violance is instigated by the Barra Brava, which strongly compare to ultra groups in southern and eastern Europe both in terms of the level of violence associated with them as well as their mafia like structures. Aside from clashing with their favourite clubs, the Barra Brava are also involved in dealing drugs, weapons, and money laundering.

Those criminal activities have let to even more clashes between different fan groups, even if they support the same club. In 2013, for example, a Boca Juniors match had to be suspended because of a shootout that had taken place before a Boca Juniors game. Two people were killed in that particular incident in which 150 bullets were fired. Drive-by shootings between different fan groups have also become a common occurrence.

But fan violence is not the only problem in Argentinian league football. Just two weeks ago a San Lorenzo fan died after falling 50 metres from the back of a stand at the Nuevo Gasómetro during San Lorenzo’s classico derby against their rivals Huracán. This particular incident occurred despite the fact that the stadium announcer asked fans to get down from elevated positions within the stadium.

These recent incidents show that Argentinian football need true reform. The recent reform attempt that introduced a new league system has done little to address major issues such as fan violence and the many outdated, crumbling stadiums.

The new behemoth league system actually aggrevates the current situation as rivals are now set to play each other even more often, but the lack of proper security measures, and the fact that the Barra Brava effectively control the ticket sales of the major clubs means that violence and security risks will remain a major problem. Another issue is corruption and that the Barra Brava have been able to buy favours among local politicians, and police forces, which makes actual reform virtually impossible in the country in the near future.

By Manuel Veth

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0